A real Half Wheeler

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Fun Run Robbie at the Biggin Hill Air Show, and pictures of a bike

Mrs FRR  standing in front of a tank.

Her German Officer

The Red Arrows ,Fecking flash brycream boys

Now thats a good old bike

Watch your arse bosh boys

Brycream Boys waiting for the bosh

This Jet is a member of the Taliban Hunting Club

Scouse Pepes sister Mrs Savage and Mrs FRR

The famous harrier jump jet that bombed the shifty eyed maradona boys during the falklands war.

The classic running distance “Three spitefires come out of the sun”, i did run in the same race as all three at some point in my running career, however those boys were much much faster

Cool Kit for the bike, the rugby ball chain ring

The Tape Disc Wheel does work, at the Verulam CC 10 Mile Time Trial held on the Codicote Road. 2 Weeks ago i set my best time at 35:43, tonight a New PB of 34:24

Favorite cycling jersey from the Chiltern 100

Fun Run Robbie’s Favorite French Cheese and Belgium Beer

Saint Agur Blue

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

France

Saint Agur
SaintAgurCheese.jpg
Country of origin
Region, town Auvergne, Monts du Velay
Source of milk Cow
Pasteurised Yes
Texture Soft
Aging time 2 months
Certification Unknown

Saint Agur (pronounced [sɛ̃taɡyʁ]) is a blue cheese made from pasteurized cow’s milk from the village of Beauzac in the Monts du Velay, part of the mountainous Auvergne region of central France. Developed in 1988 by the cheese company Bongrain, it is made from pasteurised cow’s milk, enriched with cream, and contains 60% butterfat qualifying it as a double-cream cheese. Aged for 60 days in cellars, the cheese becomes stronger and spicier as it ages.

The moist, rich, white cheese has characteristic olive green mold veins throughout and a smooth, creamy texture with a subtle mild spicy taste resembling a softer, and finer Roquefort in presentation and taste. It is not as salty as more traditional blue cheese, and its tangy and creamy nature are balanced so not to overpower with a sharp bite like a Stilton, although this is dependent in the age of the cheese. Due to its double-cream nature, this cheese is easily spread and also melts well.

Saint Agur is produced in 2-kilogram octagonal cylinders, rendering a shape that makes it easy to cut into wedges. It has no rind and comes in foil to prevent the cheese from becoming more blue.

No saint has ever been named Agur.

No village, in France or elsewhere, has ever been named Saint Agur.

[edit] References

  • Harbutt, Juliet; Roz Denny (1999). A Cook’s Guide To Cheese. Lorenz Books. ISBN 0-7548-0026-1 =

[edit] See also